Breast Imaging

At Mink Radiology, we specialize in a variety of imaging modalities. We offer breast imaging and mammography in comfortable, private, and discreet examination rooms. Other imaging modalities include radiography and x-rays, which are non-invasive and painless tests performed by our radiographic specialists.

Breast Imaging – A breast MRI is primarily used as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen women at high risk for breast cancer, evaluate the extent of cancer following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. MRI of the breast is not a replacement for mammography or ultrasound imaging but rather a supplemental tool that has many important uses.

Diagnosis:

  • Screening in women at high risk for breast cancer
  • Determining the extent of cancer after a new diagnosis of breast cancer. After being diagnosed with breast cancer, a breast MRI may be performed to determine the following:
    • how large the cancer is and whether it involves the underlying muscle.
    • if there are other cancers in the same breast and whether there is an unsuspected cancer in the opposite breast.
    • if there are any abnormally large lymph nodes in the armpit, which can be a sign the cancer has spread to that site.
  • Further evaluating hard-to-assess abnormalities seen on mammography
  • Evaluating lumpectomy sites in the years following breast cancer treatment
  • Following chemotherapy treatment in patients
  • Evaluating breast implants

MAMMOGRAPHY

Breast Imaging in Beverly Hills and Los AngelesMammography is specialized medical imaging that uses a low-dose x-rays to see inside the breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, aids in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.

Mammograms are used as a screening tool to detect early breast cancer in women experiencing no symptoms. They can also be used to detect and diagnose breast disease in women experiencing symptoms such as a lump, pain, skin dimpling or nipple discharge.

Screening Mammography

Mammography plays a central part in early detection of breast cancers because it can show changes in the breast up to two years before a patient or physician can feel them. Current guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) recommend screening mammography every year for women, beginning at age 40. Research has shown that annual mammograms lead to early detection of breast cancers, when they are most curable and breast-conservation therapies are available.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) adds that women who have had breast cancer, and those who are at increased risk due to a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, should seek expert medical advice about whether they should begin screening before age 40 and the need for other types of screening. If you are at high risk for breast cancer, you may need to obtain a breast MRI in addition to your annual mammogram.

Diagnostic Mammography

Diagnostic mammography is used to evaluate a patient with abnormal clinical findings—such as a breast lump or nipple discharge—that have been found by the woman or her doctor. Diagnostic mammography may also be done after an abnormal screening mammogram in order to evaluate the area of concern on the screening exam.

BENEFITS

  • Imaging of the breast improves a physician’s ability to detect small tumors. When cancers are small, the woman has more treatment options.
  • The use of screening mammography increases the detection of small abnormal tissue growths confined to the milk ducts in the breast, called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). These early tumors cannot harm patients if they are removed at this stage and mammography is an excellent way to detect these tumors. It is also useful for detecting all types of breast cancer, including invasive ductal and invasive lobular cancer.
  • No radiation remains in a patient’s body after an x-ray examination.
  • X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam.

RISKS

  • There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk.
  • False Positive Mammograms. Five percent to 15 percent of screening mammograms require more testing such as additional mammograms or ultrasound. Most of these tests turn out to be normal. If there is an abnormal finding, a follow-up or biopsy may have to be performed. Most of the biopsies confirm that no cancer was present. It is estimated that a woman who has yearly mammograms between ages 40 and 49 has about a 30 percent chance of having a false-positive mammogram at some point in that decade and about a 7 percent to 8 percent chance of having a breast biopsy within the 10-year period.
  • Women should always inform their physician or x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant.

 

Next, learn about our Radiography & X-Rays.